NT nursery to grow export success

 

NT nursery to grow export success 
The Department of Agriculture’s Authorised Officer (AO) programme is saving Australian exporters time and money by empowering them to undertake specific export inspections. 
 
Australia’s Chief Plant Protection Officer, Dr Vanessa Findlay, said the AO programme provides greater flexibility to export businesses.
 
“Plant and plant products for overseas markets must be inspected to ensure importing country’s requirements are met. This programme allows authorised people to carry out these export inspections on behalf of the Commonwealth, while still providing the same assurances,” Dr Findlay said. 
 
As newly registered AOs, Karen and Josef Perner of the Northern Territory nursery—Cycad Enterprises—are looking forward to greater flexibility and efficiency in sending cycad and boab trees into overseas markets. 
 
“The Perners have completed an extensive training programme, theory and practical assessments as part of becoming Authorised Officers.
 
“As AOs, Karen and Josef can now undertake inspection tasks in-house, applying the same high standards of assessment which give importing countries appropriate assurance that their requirements have been met.”
 
Ms Perner said having their business based in a remote area presented some logistical issues when participating in government inspections. 
 
“However, now that we’re registered AOs, we can complete inspections at times that suit us while still ensuring the integrity of our products, rather than waiting for a departmental officer to travel from Darwin,” Ms Perner said.
 
“All of our inspection records are carefully cross-checked by the Department of Agriculture before they issue the certification needed for exporting products from Australia.”
 
For more information on the AO program, visit www.daff.gov.au/biosecurity/export/plants-plant-products/ao. 

NT nursery to grow export success

The Department of Agriculture’s Authorised Officer (AO) programme is saving Australian exporters time and money by empowering them to undertake specific export inspections.  Australia’s Chief Plant Protection Officer, Dr Vanessa Findlay, said the AO programme provides greater flexibility to export businesses. 

“Plant and plant products for overseas markets must be inspected to ensure importing country’s requirements are met. This programme allows authorised people to carry out these export inspections on behalf of the Commonwealth, while still providing the same assurances,” Dr Findlay said.  

As newly registered AOs, Karen and Josef Perner of the Northern Territory nursery—Cycad Enterprises—are looking forward to greater flexibility and efficiency in sending cycad and boab trees into overseas markets.  

“The Perners have completed an extensive training programme, theory and practical assessments as part of becoming Authorised Officers. 

“As AOs, Karen and Josef can now undertake inspection tasks in-house, applying the same high standards of assessment which give importing countries appropriate assurance that their requirements have been met.” 

Ms Perner said having their business based in a remote area presented some logistical issues when participating in government inspections.  

“However, now that we’re registered AOs, we can complete inspections at times that suit us while still ensuring the integrity of our products, rather than waiting for a departmental officer to travel from Darwin,” Ms Perner said. 

“All of our inspection records are carefully cross-checked by the Department of Agriculture before they issue the certification needed for exporting products from Australia.” 

For more information on the AO program, visit www.daff.gov.au/biosecurity/export/plants-plant-products/ao