Growing the industry

Nursery Papers

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Nursery Paper May 2014

The Importance of Suitable Sources of Irrigation Water to Nursery Businesses

Poor quality water can have potential impacts to plant health and product quality when used in the production, maintenance and detailing of plants for sale. A source of high quality irrigation water at an affordable price is critical to the successful production and maintenance of plants. Consideration should be given not only of the irrigation water applied directly to the plants, but also to the overall production and irrigation systems in place. In this month’s Nursery Paper, NGINA Industry Development Officer, Michael Danelon seeks to raise awareness of the importance of identifying your water source and managing irrigation water, along with covering some simple testing parameters and information resources.

Nursery Paper April 2014

Pesticide Application on Edibles

Pesticides are an essential tool in the control of pests in nursery production. However special consideration should be given to the use of pesticides on edible crops especially those with potential to be readily eaten. In this month’s Nursery Paper Grant Dalwood (NGISA) and Chris O’Connor (NGIA) remind industry of some of the key considerations when it comes to pesticide application in edible crops.

Nursery Paper March 2014

Pruning & Staking- Back to Basics

In light of the recent work being conducted to draft an Australian standard for tree stock, there has been renewed focus throughout the industry on tree quality. In this month’s Nursery Paper NGINA IDO for the Northern Rivers Des Boorman will undertake a back to basics review of the importance, use and techniques of root control, pruning and staking stock for consistent quality production.

Nursery Paper February 2014

Accurately diagnosing weeds, pests and diseases affecting nursery crops.

Accurately diagnosing weeds, pests and diseases affecting nursery crops can be challenging. If left unchecked these pests can increase costs and reduce productivity. Therefore it is important to take action early to prevent widespread infestations through correct diagnostics.

This months nursery paper was prepared by Andrew Manners* (Senior Entomologist and manager of Grow Help Australia DAFFQ) and John Duff* (Senior Plant Protectionist DAFFQ) as part of the levy funded project ‘NY11001 Plant health, biosecurity, risk management and capacity building for the nursery industry.

Nursery Paper December 2013

Valuing the urban forest in Sydney


Any grower can tell you the price of a tree but how many can tell you the value that trees offer to the community? The objective of the project “Understanding the carbon and pollution mitigation potential of Australia's urban forest” was to test and improve methodologies for evaluating the ecological and social value of the urban forest. In this months nursery paper, Dr Marco Amati of La Trobe University explains how this was done along two major highways in Sydney.

Nursery Paper November 2013

Managing Chemicals of Security Concern Across the Nursery & Garden Industry Supply Chain


The Council of Australian Governments has identified 11 chemicals that are considered high-risk because they can be used to make homemade explosives. Australian governments in partnership with industries have developed a voluntary National Code of Practice for Chemicals of Security Concern to provide information and guidance on minimising the risk of these chemicals falling into the wrong hands.

In this month’s Nursery Paper, NGIA Research & Market Development Manager, Dr Anthony Kachenko provides an overview of the voluntary code as well as existing industry resources to manage chemicals of security concern across the nursery & garden industry supply chain.

Nursery Paper October 2013

Certified Budwood Schemes – helping to protect: you, your business, industry, environment and the community.


The ability of the nursery industry to secure “high-health” plant propagation material does exist for some commodities via certification and improvement schemes. However, material is not available for all types of material needed by plant industries In this month’s Nursery Paper, NGINA Industry Development Officer Michael Danelon looks at some of the options available to the industry to secure plant propagation material with the purity, authenticity and reliability to perform and enhance both the industry and environment.

Nursery Paper September 2013

Automating Irrigation Scheduling in Nursery Production


Traditionally irrigation scheduling in production nurseries has been determined by past experience (gut feel) and the setting of specific run times depending on the season. Other common methods employed include manual moisture assessment of individual containers, daily evaporation measurements or using a weight method to determine a container’s water holding capacity.

In this month’s Nursery Paper Queensland Industry Development Manager John McDonald and Research Scientist David Hunt describe the water use efficiency and cost savings achieved through the automation of irrigation scheduling.

Nursery Paper August 2013

Bridging the Ebusiness Technology Gap in the NSW Nursery and Garden Industry


In this month’s Nursery Paper NGINA Business Skills Development Officer, Bob Wynyard reports on recent work undertaken in developing E business solutions and training in the Nursery Industry.

NGIA Nursery Paper July 2013

Managing iron in nursery irrigation systems

Having a source of good quality water is vital to any professional nursery operation. In this month’s Nursery Paper, Victorian Industry Development Officer David Reid examines iron content in nursery irrigation systems, covering why it may be of concern and how best to manage it.

NGIA Nursery Paper June 2013

Management of fungus gnats in nursery production

This months nursery paper was prepared by Dr. Andrew Manners Senior Entomologist at the Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, and examines the managment of Fungus Gnats in Nursery production. Fungus gnats are a common problem in production nurseries and propagation greenhouses and can cause significant damage, economic loss and the spread of fungal diseases.  To manage fungus gnats, careful and deliberate planning is required.

NGIA Nursery Paper May 2013

Emerging Biosecurity threats and industry preparedness.

Biosecurity is an ongoing challenge for our Industry with new exotic plant pests and diseases emerging around the globe. In this month’s Nursery Paper NSW Industry Development Officer Michael Danelon looks at some of these emerging threats to Australia and how our industry is positioned to deal with these.

NGIA Nursery Paper April 2013

Urban Vegetation and Heat Related Mortality

In this month’s Nursery Paper, Dr Dong Chen and the team from Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) look at urban vegetation and its impact upon heat related mortality. This research represents one of the first attempts to develop quantitative estimates of the potential benefit of urban vegetation in reducing heat related mortality.The project involved modelling of vegetation and mortality relationships for the summer of 2009 and projected future climates in Melbourne. Different urban vegetation scenarios were tested, with the forest scheme predicted to achieve up to 100% reduction in excess mortality rate in comparison with the CBD vegetation scheme. From these results it is recommended that urban vegetation be a key component in heat wave mitigation and for preventative health.

NGIA Nursery Paper March 2013

Crisis Management in the Australian Nursery Industry

There are a number of issues which have the potential to escalate into a crisis and cause serious adverse commercial and reputational impact to the Australian nursery and garden industry, both at an individual business level and at a state or national organisation level. As an industry we must take the opportunity to be prepared to address these issues before they arise. In this month’s Nursery Paper NGIA Policy and Technical Officer Chris O’Connor explains what a crisis is in the nursery industry, the importance of crisis management, steps to take during a crisis and where to turn to if you need help with a crisis.

NGIA Nursery Paper February 2013

Survey of Nursery Industry Attitudes towards the Australian Urban Forest

In order to better understand the attitudes of the Australian nursery and garden industry (NGI)
in relation to urban forests, Nursery and Garden Industry Australia (NGIA) undertook a Survey
of Nursery Industry Attitudes towards the Australian Urban Forest. The survey was conducted
online via Survey Monkey during September and October 2012 and targeted the retail,
production and allied sectors of the Australian NGI. In this month’s Nursery Paper,
NGIA Environmental & Technical Policy Manager, Dr Anthony Kachenko reports on
the key results and recommendations of this survey.

NGIA Nursery Paper December 2012

Minor Use Pesticide Program

The Minor Use Pesticide program allows for pesticides (insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, plant growth regulators, etc.), that do not have a legally approved label registration, to be used in a non-registered cropping system under an authorised APVMA permit. In this months Nursery Paper, Queensland Industry Development Manager John McDonald explains how managing the National Minor Use Pesticide Portfolio delivers new chemistry to support on-farm plant protection management activities.

NGIA Nursery Paper November 2012

Fungicide resistance

Fungicides are often used as a critical part of an integrated pathogen control strategy as pathogenic fungi have the ability to significantly reduce the yield and quality of plant stock if left untreated. However with incorrect management there is potential for fungicide resistance to develop. In this month's Nursery Paper Industry Development Officer David Reid investigates fungicide resistance and explores suitable methods for controlling this.

NGIA Nursery Paper October 2012

Reducing the Pest Risk – Industry’s Policy Position on Biosecurity and Quarantine

Nursery and Garden Industry Australia launched ‘Reducing the Pest Risk – The Australian Nursery and Garden Industry's Policy Position on Quarantine and Biosecurity’ at its National Conference on Thursday 15 March 2012. The Policy Position paves the way for industry to ensure biosecurity responsibilities are shared equally between governments, industry and the community as part of the biosecurity continuum.
In this month’s Nursery Paper NGIA Environmental & Technical Policy Manager, Dr Anthony Kachenko provides an overview of this Policy Position and what it means for industry.

NGIA Nursery Paper September 2012

Cylindrocladium diseases of nursery plants

Various species of the fungus Cylindrocladium cause a wide range of destructive diseases in nursery plants and are particularly prevalent in more tropical areas. Cylindrocladium scoparium occurs worldwide, and is the most commonly reported causal agent of Cylindrocladium diseases in Australia, although a number of other species are also important pathogens including Cylindrocladium spathiphylli.

This nursery paper was prepared by Lindy Coates, Leif Forsberg and Tony Cooke (Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF), Queensland) as part of levy funded project NY11001 Plant health, biosecurity, risk management and capacity building for the nursery industry. It provides an overview of the fungus Cylindrocladium and how to prevent and control this disease of nursery plants.

NGIA Nursery Paper August 2012

How to Minimise the Effects of Carbon Pricing on Nursery Production Systems

On July 1 2012, the new carbon price policy – Clean Energy Future – was introduced by the Australian Government. While the nursery industry will not be directly involved in the carbon price mechanism, it is expected that the carbon price will result in cost increases for key agricultural inputs with the most significant costs relating to energy and energy intensive inputs such as fertilisers, chemicals and machinery .
In this month’s Nursery Paper NGIA Environmental & Technical Policy Manager, Dr Anthony Kachenko provides an overview of strategies that can be applied within production systems to minimise the impact of the carbon price policy .

NGIA Nursery Paper July 2012

A pest concern for Production Nurseries that reinforces the need for IPM in your business

Over the past few years many new varieties of plant species have been developed and sold widely within the nursery industry of Australia.

Subsequently, as plant stocks increase within production nurseries and variations in local climatic conditions have their effect on insects and pests in and around crops, different issues are raised regarding identification and treatment of unusual pest problems that generally do not require treatment!

In this months Nursery Paper IDO Grant Dalwood looks at the impacts of Midge Flies on the nursery industry and suitable methods for their control.

NGIA Nursery Paper June 2012

Mitigating Extreme Summer Temperatures with Vegetation

Recently, Dr Dong Chen and the team from Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and NGIA modelled the potential benefit of vegetation in reducing extreme summer temperatures in Melbourne CBD under different climate scenarios. Results showed that the cooling benefit of various urban forms and vegetation schemes may be in the range of 0.3°C to 2°C. The team also found that although Melbourne is projected to be warmer in 2050 and 2090, the relative benefit of urban vegetation will not change significantly. In this Nursery Paper, Dr Dong Chen details the rationale to this research and the results to date.

 

NGIA Nursery Paper May 2012

Do herbicides applied in production nurseries have the potential to leach and accumulate in water storages?

The use of pesticides (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides) are an integral part of containerised plant production. They are used to assist nursery managers in maintaining a clean, healthy growing environment, while reducing labour to manage pests and weeds. In this Nursery Paper, NGINA Industry Development Officer Michael Danelon summarises the findings of a research project looking into “Herbicide residues in nursery dam water: A pilot monitoring program report” conducted by the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) Queensland.

NGIA Nursery Paper April 2012

The Nursery Production Plant Health & Biosecurity Project

The use of pesticides (herbicides, insecticides and fungicides) are an integral part of containerised plant production. They are used to assist nursery managers in maintaining a clean, healthy growing environment, while
reducing labour to manage pests and weeds. In this Nursery Paper, NGINA Industry Development Officer Michael Danelon summarises the findings of a research project looking into “Herbicide residues in nursery dam water: A pilot
monitoring program report” conducted by the Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) Queensland.

The Nursery Production Plant Health & Biosecurity Project covers a number of disciplines including research, industry development and extension in partnership with Agri-Science Queensland. The project is aimed at enhancing and strengthening the capacity of industry to plan, manage and respond to plant pest issues across Australia at both a farm and strategic national level. In this Nursery Paper, NGIQ Industry Development Manager John McDonald, provides a summary of this significant industry levy funded project.

 

NGIA Nursery Paper March 2012

Taking our strategy to the next phase - More Trees Please to Improve your Plant/Life Balance.

In 2011 the Australian nursery & garden industry launched its new marketing strategy titled Improve Your Plant/Life Balance.   This strategy was designed to meet objectives within the industry’s Strategic Plan 2010-2015.

The first phase was launched with the campaign, ‘Put a Plant on Your Desk’, and was judged an outstanding success.  In 2012 the Australian nursery & garden industry takes the strategy to its next level with a campaign called ‘More Trees Please’, which has been developed in conjunction with an industry consultative panel.

This Nursery Paper outlines the objectives of this campaign, its key elements and the range of activities which will be implemented throughout the year. Importantly, this campaign will build upon the work already done to engage with target audiences through established social media networks.